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Year 6 - Apple & Elm

IPC Homework Project - Autumn 2

In preparation for the Year 6 SATs, pupils are expected to complete their weekly homework, which includes spellings and Maths and English work which will be set from the CGP books provided.

This will be given out on a Friday and it needs to be returned to school the following Wednesday.

Your IPC project for this half term – a creative task I hope you’ll accept – involves you: creating a musical instrument. The instrument can be created using junk or various materials you may have at home. The project needs to be finished and brought into school by Wednesday 22th November 2017 so you can present it to the class and tell us all about it.

 

Websites you may find useful:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zv48q6f

http://www.educationquizzes.com/ks2/english/

http://www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/revision/engindex.html

 

Mathematics

 

By the end of year 6, children will structure their own investigations and solve a wide variety of increasingly complex problems. They will independently develop their own lines of enquiry and be expected to prove their solutions in a variety of ways including algebra, negative proof (use a counter example to prove the rule) and be able to communicate their results using accurate mathematical language. Children will demonstrate secure knowledge and confidence to talk in depth about mathematical concepts and explain their solutions, decisions and reasoning.

 

Number

 

Counting and understanding numbers: Children extend and apply their knowledge of place value for numbers up to and beyond one million (including decimals and negative numbers) in a variety of situations. Special numbers are extended to include common factors, common multiples and a deeper understanding of prime numbers. Children will be able to round numbers and identify what degree of accuracy is appropriate.

 

Calculating: Children will be fluent in a wide range of mental and formal written calculation strategies for all operations, extending to long division (four digit numbers by two digit numbers) by the end of the year. They will apply estimation in a range of ways. Through investigations, they explore the effect of the order of operations including the use of brackets.

 

Fractions including decimals and percentages: Children recall and using equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages. Additionally, they are able to express fractions in their simplest form and calculate the decimal equivalent, for example  = 3 ÷ 8 = 0.375. Applying this understanding of equivalent fractions, children will order, add and subtract fractions (including mixed numbers and those with different denominators) by the end of the year e.g.  + ¼  + c = 1. Using hands-on resources and images, they will multiply and divide proper fractions and mixed numbers by whole numbers e.g. ¼ x ½  and ÷ 2 = . Children will solve problems involving the calculation of percentages linked to real life situations.

 

Ratio and proportion

Pupils explore ratio and proportion through real life experiences such as changing the quantities in recipes (scaling), scale drawings and maps.

 

Algebra

Throughout their primary experience children will have encountered algebra in a number of different situations which is drawn together and formalised in year 6. By the end of the year, they will confidently use symbols and letters to represent variables and unknowns in mathematical situations that they already understand, for example, simple formula and equivalent expressions a+b = b+a. Children will describe number sequences and missing number calculations.

 

Measurement

Through investigation and problem solving, children convert between a range of measurement units (including both imperial and metric). Calculation of perimeter and area is extended to include parallelograms and triangles. Additionally, they will explore the relationship between area and perimeter. They will know how to calculate, estimate and compare volume of cubes and cuboids identifying when it is appropriate to use formula.

 

Geometry

Children will draw 2-D and build 3-D shapes with accuracy using given dimensions and angles. They will create nets of common 3-D shapes. They will consolidate their knowledge of angles within shapes and extend it to find missing angles in triangles, quadrilaterals and regular polygons. Children name parts of circles, including radius, diameter and circumference, and explore the relationships between these elements. Children will use four quadrant co-ordinate grids to describe positions, draw and translate simple shapes. Using their knowledge of the properties of shape, they will be able to predict missing co-ordinates and express these algebraically.

 

Statistics

Children will increase their knowledge of different data representations to include interpreting and constructing pie charts (using their knowledge of angles, fractions and percentages) and line graphs (e.g. miles to km conversion). They will know when it is appropriate to use the mean as an average and how to calculate it.

 

 

English

 

In English lessons, children are taught speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through studying a variety of styles of writing. Teachers follow the Teaching Sequence for Writing, which means that children will firstly be taught to read and understand the text, then practise the skills of the style of writing (including grammar) and apply into their own writing. 

 

Speaking and Listening

Children will be taught to discuss their learning and to develop speaking skills. They will become more familiar with and confident in, using language in a variety of situations, for a range of audiences and purposes. They will, for example

  • Develop their understanding of a subject through discussions, learning to give their opinions and listen to other viewpoints.
  • Speak clearly and in different ways for drama, formal presentations and debate.
  • They will prepare work orally, through drama and role play, discussing, rehearsing and recording their ideas.

 

Reading

Reading is broken down into ‘word reading’ and ‘comprehension’. 

Children will be encouraged to work out unfamiliar words that they meet.  They should use their knowledge of word roots and word families to help them to understand new words.  Children will be taught key comprehension skills to enable them to read, understand and enjoy a wide range of books. Year 6 will have the opportunity to read and discuss a wider range of fiction, poetry, plays and non-fiction.  They will, for example:

  • Identify and discuss themes and conventions across a wide range of writing
  • Predict what may happen based on evidence and clues given
  • Give responses to texts and recommend books to peers, giving reasons for views and choices
  • Use clues from the text to work out characters’ feeling, actions or motives and give evidence to back their conclusions
  • Discuss and evaluate how authors use language and consider the impact on the reader
  • Compare different texts

 

Writing

Writing is developed through teaching the following:

 

Spelling: Children should learn to spell new words correctly and have opportunities to practise spelling skills.  They will be taught spelling patterns and conventions, and draw on their knowledge of word families and roots to help them spell new words correctly.  They will continue to practise and use the words included in the National Curriculum for years 5 & 6. Children will be expected to use a dictionary and thesaurus.

 

Handwriting: Pupils will continue to be taught handwriting in order to increase speed, fluency and legibility.

 

Composition: This includes vocabulary, grammar and punctuation. To develop their composition skills, the children will be taught to

  • Plan, draft, compose, edit and evaluate their writing
  • Use a wide variety of punctuation and grammar features with confidence
  • Refine their grammar and vocabulary to further develop the effectiveness of their writing
  • Use a wider range of techniques to build detail into their writing and ensure it flows smoothly throughout the sections of a piece.
  •  Build on their understanding of the differences between Standard and non-Standard English, and will also focus on how to achieve different levels of formality in their spoken and written language.
  • Adapt writing for a range of purposes and audiences as part of their work across the curriculum.

 

 

Year 6 - Written Calculation Policy


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