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Year 2 - Beech & Walnut

IPC Homework Project- Autumn 2

What’s It Made Of?

 

Your project for this half term – a learning mission I hope you’ll accept – involves you designing and making outfits for traction man.

 

 

He needs an outfit for each season (Autumn, Winter, Spring and Summer) and each outfit must be made out of recycled materials. Below are some examples from last year.

 

    

 

    

 

    

 

Your outfits need to be finished and brought into school by Wednesday 22nd November.

 

 

 

Mathematics

 

Working mathematically

By the end of Year 2, children will solve problems with one or a small number of simple steps. Children will discuss their understanding and begin to explain their thinking using appropriate mathematical vocabulary, hands-on resources and different ways of recording. They will ask simple questions relevant to the problem and begin to suggest ways of solving them.

Number

· Counting and understanding numbers

Children will develop their understanding of place value of numbers to at least 100 and apply this when ordering, comparing, estimating and rounding. Children will begin to understand zero as a place holder as this is the foundation for manipulating larger numbers in subsequent years. Children will count fluently forwards and backwards up to and beyond 100 in multiples of 2, 3, 5 and 10 from any number. They will use hands-on resources to help them understand and apply their knowledge of place value in two digit numbers, representing the numbers in a variety of different ways.

· Calculating

Children will learn that addition and multiplication number sentences can be re-ordered and the answer remains the same (commutative law) such as 9+5+1= 5+1+9. They learn that this is not the case with subtraction and division. They will solve a variety of problems using mental and written calculations for +, -, x, ÷ in practical contexts. These methods will include partitioning which is where the number is broken up into more manageable parts (e.g. 64 = 60 + 4 or 50 + 14), re-ordering (e.g. moving the larger number to the beginning of the number sentence when adding several small numbers) and using a number line. Children will know the 2, 5 and 10 times tables, as well as the matching division facts (4 x 5 = 20, 20 ÷ 5 = 4) and shall recall them quickly and accurately. They will apply their knowledge of addition and subtraction facts to 20 and use these to work out facts up to 100 (e.g. 3 + 7 = 10 so 30 + 70 = 100).

 

Fractions including decimals

Throughout Year 2 children will develop their understanding of fractions and the link to division. They will explore this concept using pictures, images and hands-on resources. They will solve problems involving fractions (e.g. find 1/3 of the hexagon or ¼ of the marbles) and record what they have done. They will count regularly and fluently in fractions such as ½ and ¼ forwards and backwards and, through positioning them on a number line, understand that some have the same value (equivalent) e.g. ½ = 2/4.


Measurement

Children will estimate, choose, use and compare a variety of measurements for length, mass, temperature, capacity, time and money. By the end of Year 2, they will use measuring apparatus such as rulers accurately. They will use their knowledge of measurement to solve problems (e.g. how many ways to make 50p). They extend their understanding of time to tell and write it on an analogue clock to 5-minute intervals, including quarter past / to the hour. They will know key time related facts (minutes in an hour, hours in a day) and relate this to their everyday life. We highly recommend you purchase your child a wristwatch!

Geometry

Children will identify, describe, compare and sort common 2-D and 3-D shapes according to their properties (sides, vertices, edges, faces) and apply this knowledge to solve simple problems. They shall develop their understanding by finding examples of 3-D shapes in the real world and exploring the 2-D shapes that can be found on them (e.g. a circle is one of the faces on a cylinder). Children will begin to describe position, direction and movement in a range of different situations, including understanding rotation (turning through right angles clockwise and anti-clockwise). They will also use their knowledge of shape in patterns and sequences.

Statistics

Children will get opportunities sort and compare information, as well as communicating findings by asking and answering questions. They will draw simple pictograms, tally charts and tables. Much of this work will occur in science and other areas of the curriculum

 

 

 

English

 

In English lessons, children are taught speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through studying a focus text. Teachers follow the school’s Teaching Sequence for Writing, which means that children will firstly be taught to read and understand the text, then practise the skills of the style of writing (including grammar) and apply into their own writing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaking and Listening

 

The children will become more familiar with and confident in using language in a greater variety of situations.

 

They will, for example:

 

  • Listen to and discuss a wide range of books and poems
  • Recognise and join in with predictable phrases
  • Learn some rhymes and poems to recite by heart
  • Discuss the meaning of words and extend vocabulary
  • Join in with discussions and explain their understanding
  • Change their speaking when taking on a role of a character during play

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading

 

In Year 2, to become more fluent in reading the children will:

 

  • read accurately and fluently most words of two or more syllables without overt sounding and blending
  • read most words containing common suffixes, e.g. –ed, -ing
  • read most common exception words (see below for Year 2 common exception word list)
  • answer questions and make some inferences on the basis of what is being said and done.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing

 

In Year 2 children will develop their writing to include the following key areas:

 

Compostion

 

  • write simple, coherent narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real or fictional)
  • write about real events, recording these simply and clearly

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar

 

  • demarcate sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops, and use question marks correctly when required
  • use present and past tense mostly correctly and consistently
  • use co-ordination (e.g. or / and / but) and some subordination (e.g. when / if / that / because) to join clauses
  • segment spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes, spelling many of these words correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others
  • spell many common exception words  (see below Year 2 common exception word list)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Teacher PowerPoint

Common Exception Words List


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